SURVIVOR

As we enter Breast Cancer Awareness month, we are reminded of the high number of women who have battled or are currently fighting the disease. We wanted to share the story of a survivor. Natalie Mobley was diagnosed at the age of 30, I recently had the pleasure of talking with her about her fight against breast cancer.

 

How did you find out you had breast cancer?
While completing somewhat of a self-breast exam at the end of the night, I noticed a small lump on the upper portion of my right breast. I immediately sat up to confirm what I was feeling was a lump. The next day, I made an appointment to meet with my Gynecologist so that she could confirm that there was a lump. She then sent me over to the Comprehensive Cancer Institute in Olympia Fields, IL to have a Mammogram.

What did you feel like once you knew?
After my biopsy results were complete, I was informed that I would get a call later on in the week with my results; I received a call the next day asking me to come into the office. I then knew that there was something wrong with my results to be receiving a call the next day. When I was finally able to get in the office, my Gynecologist sat me down and showed me a document which indicated that I had Stage 2 Ductal Carcinoma in STIU (DCIS) & Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) Breast Cancer.  For a moment, I was stuck. I didn’t speak because I knew that I was going to break down. As soon as she left the room, I broke down into tears with my then 2 year old son by my side. My son then said to me, “Everything is going to be ok Mommy” which he said at a perfect moment. I walked to my car with a million thoughts a minute:  Am I going to die at 30? What’s going to happen to my son? Did I catch it early enough? I should have gotten tested after my Mother past from the same illness? Will it spread?
I then turned those negative thoughts into, “I WON’T LET IT BEAT ME!”

 

 

Did you experience depression? If so how did you deal?
With the support of my family and friends, I didn’t go into a depression state. No doubt there were times in which I was down and thought about what this disease could do to me but I snapped out of it quickly. Having a strong support system, keeping busy and asking for help was essential throughout my journey.

What was it like raising a small child while fighting this disease?
There were some challenges I faced while undergoing treatment and raising my son. I felt that I was not giving him enough attention because I was busy caring for myself. When I did have the energy, I made sure that I spent as much time with him as possible. During chemotherapy, his father and I managed to take him to Disneyland. He was so helpful throughout my treatment and surgery; checking on me often, making sure we made time to take silly pictures on Snapchat and even going to my Doctor’s appointments with me. Where ever I could fit in time, I did.

During your treatment plan how did you change your diet? If you did?
Surprisingly, throughout my treatment I wanted to eat all the time due to the steroids taken on a weekly basis. After doing some research pertaining to food and cancer, I decided to change my eating habits. I have now converted to only eating Fish & Seafood aside vegetarian diet. I plan to transition to mainly vegetarian and vegan dishes. I still have my times where I want my sweets, treats and a Burger or two but for the past few months, I have been a Pescatarian.

What made you decide to start a blog about your experiences?
I decided to document my experiences because over the past few years, women my age and younger are being diagnosed with Breast Cancer. My Mother was diagnosed with a very rare form of Breast Cancer when she was 51. I know that more could have been done for her with the proper resources. My plan is share my experiences, doctors, advice, medicine, eating habits, research etc. with everyone via my Blog, Cancer at 30. My hope is that Cancer at 30 can become a Not-fo- Profit Organization within the next year to provide resources to the communities involving Breast Cancer in Women under the age of 40.

To continue to follow and stay updated on Natalie’s Journey please subscribe by going to  her webpage www.cancerat30.com

 

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.